Scottish Rite Freemasonry

Valley of Ft. Scott, Kansas

Charitable Trust

Fort Scott Scottish Rite Charitable Trust

A 501 (c) 3 Tax Exempt Organization

The Fort Scott Scottish Rite Charitable Trust

is involved with several programs that are of direct benefit to the general public.
One such program is the donation of Masonic Reading Program Balance Boards to local schools and organizations that are actively using systems of education known as “Bal-A-Vis-Ex” or “Brain-Gym”.
(Read the write-up on the Newsletter page)

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Another program, which All Masonic Organizations conduct, is the ALMONERS RELIEF FUND.

Masons donate to this fund, for the relief of need for those persons who find themselves in dire straits.  If an individual needs a small amount of monetary assistance, usually a Lodge or Valley’s Almoner is able to give some help.

These men determine what help is needed, and what money might be available.

To ensure that many people are helped, our policy is to make each donation to an individual or group as a one-time only form of assistance.  All donations are meant to be confidential, and require no publicity be provided, to preserve the dignity of those being assisted.

Several members of the Valley of Fort Scott regularly make donations to the Fort Scott Scottish Rite Charitable Trust, for the use of the Valley’s Almoners Relief Fund.

To make a donation to assist those in need, please contact the Secretary at the address listed below.

The Almoner’s Relief Fund has also made donations to the Red Cross for various disaster relief efforts, including the recent Tsunami in Southeast Asia; Hurricane Relief funds, Tornado Relief Funds, and others as needed.

It is our belief as Masons that Brotherly Love, Relief and Truth are some of the most vital tenents of man, and while our funds are limited, we will do whatever we can to help relieve the suffering of those in need.

The FORT SCOTT SCOTTISH RITE CHARITABLE TRUST

PLANNED GIVING OPPORTUNITIES

Each year the Fort Scott Scottish Rite Charitable Trust receives income not only from direct cash contributions, but also from endowment gifts given by individuals like you who want to help perpetuate the Scottish Rite Order and the many wonderful causes it supports. Planned Gifts help the Charitable Trust to remain strong and viable. That is why Planned Gifts – – gifts made to charitable organizations such as the Fort Scott Scottish Rite Charitable Trust, taking into consideration the effect of that gift upon a donor’s estate – – are so important.

Here are some examples of Planned Gift Opportunities.

 

1. GIFTS BY PERSONAL WILL – – a bequest or estate plan

Everyone has a will, whether you know it or not. Your will is either one you have written – – a personal will – – or one your state writes for you – – a state will. In other words, if you do not have your own will, your estate will be distributed according to the guidelines of the state – – not according to what you intended.

Example: John Doe is married and has three grown children who are well established in their careers. He wants to leave his stocks to his grandchildren, certain possessions to his children, $10,000 each to his church and the Fort Scott Scottish Rite Charitable Trust, and the remainder of his estate to his wife. If Mr. Doe has no written will at his death, these intentions cannot be carried out. Under Kansas law, one half of Mr. Doe’s estate will go to his wife, and one half will go to his children. State wills do not provide for gifts to charitable organizations or to extended family members.

If you have a will, but your circumstances have changed and you wish to reconsider where you have designated your assets to be distributed, you do not need to have your will redrawn. Every will can be amended by a brief, inexpensive codicil to provide for a charitable gift or other changes. Properly done, charitable gifts reduce estate taxes, thereby potentially providing greater benefits to heirs.

Existing personal wills and estate plans should be reviewed at least every three years, because of changing economic, family, and tax considerations. Wills which provide for gifts to the Fort Scott Scottish Rite Charitable Trust can constitute a pledge for the future of the Order and the services provided by the Trust.

 

2. LIFE ESTATES

You may own a residence, resort property, farm, ranch, or vacant land which you would like to give to the Fort Scott Scottish Rite Charitable Trust. If the gift is made during your lifetime, a current income tax deduction is available, and you will retain the right to use the property during your lifetime (or during your lifetime and that of a joint beneficiary).3. LIFE INSURANCE

Many individuals have paid-up life insurance policies in bank vaults or dresser drawers, policies which they or their families no longer need. These policies may presently have a cash surrender value. If you possess such a policy, you may transfer the ownership of the policy to the Fort Scott Scottish Rite Charitable Trust and receive an income tax deduction for this gift to the Charitable Trust.

Parents, grandparents, and other family members can take out a new life insurance policy on themselves, children, grandchildren, nieces, or nephews. If the Charitable Trust owns the policy, premiums paid by the donor are tax-deductible. To accomplish this, the new policy must be owned by the Charitable Trust, and the Charitable Trust must be the beneficiary.

Example: John Doe has a $10,000 veteran’s life insurance policy. In the 1950’s, this policy helped to provide security while his family was young and gave him the peace of mind that should he die prematurely, this policy would help provide for his wife and children. Mr. Doe’s children are now grown and his wife is financially secure. The $10,000 life insurance policy is no longer necessary to insure the well-being of Mr. Doe’s family. By signing over the ownership of this policy to the Fort Scott Scottish Rite Charitable Trust, Mr. Doe can take an immediate $10,000 charitable deduction and, at the same time, help provide for the future of an organization that has meant much to him during his lifetime.

 

3. LIFE INSURANCE

Many individuals have paid-up life insurance policies in bank vaults or dresser drawers, policies which they or their families no longer need. These policies may presently have a cash surrender value. If you possess such a policy, you may transfer the ownership of the policy to the Fort Scott Scottish Rite Charitable Trust and receive an income tax deduction for this gift to the Charitable Trust.

Parents, grandparents, and other family members can take out a new life insurance policy on themselves, children, grandchildren, nieces, or nephews. If the Charitable Trust owns the policy, premiums paid by the donor are tax-deductible. To accomplish this, the new policy must be owned by the Charitable Trust, and the Charitable Trust must be the beneficiary.

Example: John Doe has a $10,000 veteran’s life insurance policy. In the 1950’s, this policy helped to provide security while his family was young and gave him the peace of mind that should he die prematurely, this policy would help provide for his wife and children. Mr. Doe’s children are now grown and his wife is financially secure. The $10,000 life insurance policy is no longer necessary to insure the well-being of Mr. Doe’s family. By signing over the ownership of this policy to the Fort Scott Scottish Rite Charitable Trust, Mr. Doe can take an immediate $10,000 charitable deduction and, at the same time, help provide for the future of an organization that has meant much to him during his lifetime.

 

4. CHARITABLE REMAINDER ANNUITY TRUST

You may enter into a trust with a trustee of your choice. An individual may contribute cash, appreciated securities, or other property “in trust” to the trustee.

In turn, the trustee agrees to pay you and/or named beneficiaries a fixed amount annually, which is agreed upon at the time the trust is set up. Such annual amounts may not be less than 5 percent of the initial fair market value of the property placed in the trust. Payments from the trust may be for the life of the donor, the lives of other named beneficiaries, or for a term not to exceed 20 years.

Upon the death of the donor and other named beneficiaries or upon expiration of the term, the remaining trust assets are distributed to the Fort Scott Scottish Rite Charitable Trust. This type of gift allows the Charitable Trust to perpetually support the causes it serves.

 

5. CHARITABLE REMAINDER UNITRUST

You may enter into a trust agreement with a trustee and contribute cash, appreciated securities, or other property “in trust” to the trustee.

The trustee agrees to pay you and/or named beneficiaries an amount annually which is equal to a percentage of the fair market value of the trust. That annual percentage may not be less than 5 percent. When the trust assets appreciate, the distribution amount will increase.

Note: The unitrust also can limit each year’s payout to the lesser of the trust income or the specific percentage of the fair market value of the trust annually.

Upon the death of the named beneficiaries, the remaining trust assets are distributed to a charity of your choice, such as the Fort Scott Scottish Rite Charitable Trust.

 

6. CHARITABLE LEAD TRUST

You may enter into a trust agreement with an income interest starting after death to be paid to the Fort Scott Scottish Rite Charitable Trust for the term of the trust. The term can be for the life or lives of one or more individuals or a term of years. At the end of the term, the remainder interest will be given to a non-charitable beneficiary (usually a family member).

Example: A grandfather who is a member of the Scottish Rite transfers $100,000 to a trust agreement for 15 years. The income from the trust is to be paid to the Fort Scott Scottish Rite Charitable Trust for that period of time. The donor’s estate will receive an estate tax deduction for the value of the Charitable Trust’s income interest. At the end of 15 years, all assets will go to the grandfather’s designated beneficiary, his grandson.


Valley of Fort Scott
Orient of Kansas
PO Box 789
Fort Scott, Kansas  66701-0789
620-223-1330
fsscottishrite@sbcglobal.net
http://www.ftscottishrite.org

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